I’ll Paint It First and Then I’ll Tell You What It Is

In architecture, the prospect-refuge theory is based on a simple idea — that people like to be able to see without being seen. This comes in part through the work of ethologist Konrad Lorenz who studied animals, including humans, and their behavior. I think it applies as well to certain other aspects of life, including art and most especially visiting art galleries, museums and even … Continue reading I’ll Paint It First and Then I’ll Tell You What It Is

From Point A to Point B or Someplace in that Neck of the Woods

People ask, “What’s your painting about? How did you do it?” Every artist, writer or other creative person knows these questions. Inquiring minds want to know. The answer is usually some kind of song and dance about the creative process, choosing the right paints (paper, tap shoes, guitar strings), the muse, inspiration, one thing and another. I was advised early on that it would not … Continue reading From Point A to Point B or Someplace in that Neck of the Woods

To See with the Human Heart

In the bleak early winter – apologies to Christina Rossetti – my November studio has become more than chilly. At some moments, it’s downright bleak. I’m taken back to January art school days in Maine where we worked on our projects in an unheated building, thanks to a power failure. Classes were not cancelled. The show went on, but the faculty took pity and brought … Continue reading To See with the Human Heart

Art and Science: Together and Apart

Despite some discussions about the similarities between art and science, it’s good to be clear: they both matter, but they are not the same. David Bayles and Ted Orland make this abundantly clear in their Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking. From Bayles and Orland:“It is an article of faith, among artists and scientists alike, that at some deep level … Continue reading Art and Science: Together and Apart

Art, the Studio, and the Intimate Presence

Many arts articles I’m reading these days are not so much about the art itself but about where it’s created.  Perhaps the pandemic has made us all more conscious of how an artist works, but my guess is that with galleries closed and artists unable to freely invite the public to visit their studios, the studios themselves have become more interesting or appealing, the way the … Continue reading Art, the Studio, and the Intimate Presence

Performance Anxiety and Simple Gifts

The Art of Jazz Collection Molly Larson Cook Studio Shot – Getting Ready for the Show ©2020   Mounting an art show is a joy and a botheration.  That’s just my opinion. Joy because of course we want to have our best work seen.  Botheration because there are lots of details connected to a show that have nothing to do with painting, and also because … Continue reading Performance Anxiety and Simple Gifts

It’s Not Just About Feeling and No, a Four-Year-Old Couldn’t Do It

How can we trace, really, the beginnings of our creative life?  We write our biographies, our artists’ statements, we tell the stories, but how do we know for certain that this moment or that was the beginning? Biographies of musicians sometimes include “She picked up the guitar at age 3 and…”  But really?  Is that the beginning a creative life?  Or, “He began writing short … Continue reading It’s Not Just About Feeling and No, a Four-Year-Old Couldn’t Do It

Take Me To A Place I Haven’t Been

“Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” from the Colors of Jazz collection © 2020, Molly Larson Cook Acrylic, 24″ x 30″   Knowing who you are and where you belong in the art world can be a bit dicey.  With social media, big auctions, “everybody’s a critic,” and the rest of the 21st century hoo hah, it’s even dicier than before. This is especially true since there are … Continue reading Take Me To A Place I Haven’t Been

Don’t Get Caught Chasing Shiny Objects

          “Above/Below”                                    #1, Red Iris Series Mixed media on cardboard            Mixed media on cardboard 5″ x 8″                                                  5″ x 8″ These are originals, not prints.  They are matted to size 8″ x 10″ and sell for $35 each, including shipping.   T.S. Eliot was wrong about April being the cruelest month.  At least wrong for this year.  January was cruel indeed around here, and instead of spending … Continue reading Don’t Get Caught Chasing Shiny Objects